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Latest and Most Accurate Cisco 100-105 Dumps Exam Questions and Answers:

Version: 12.0
Question: 21

How many bits are contained in each field of an IPv6 address?

A. 24
B. 4
C. 8
D. 16

Answer: D

Explanation:
One of the key advantages IPv6 brings is the exponentially larger address space. The following will outline the basic address architecture of IPv6.
128-bit-long addresses
Represented in hexadecimal format:
Uses CIDR principles: prefix/prefix length
x:x:x:x:x:x:x:x, where x is a 16-bit hex field
The last 64 bits are used for the interface ID
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/technologies/tk648/tk872/technologies_white_paper0900aecd8026003d.pdf

Question: 22

Which three approaches can be used while migrating from an IPv4 addressing scheme to an IPv6 scheme? (Choose three)

A. static mapping of IPv4 address to IPv6 addresses
B. configuring IPv4 tunnels between IPv6 islands
C. use DHCPv6 to map IPv4 addresses to IPv6 addresses
D. use proxying and translation (NAT-PT) to translate IPv6 packets into IPv4 packets
E. configure IPv6 directly
F. enable dual-stack routing

Answer: B, D, F

Explanation:
Connecting IPv6 islands with tunnels
An IPv6 island is a network made of IPv6 links directly connected by IPv6 routers. In the early days of IPv6 deployment, there are many IPv6 islands. IPv6 in IPv4 tunnels are used to connect those islands together. In each island, one (or more) dual stack routers are designated to encapsulate and decapsulate IPv6 packets within IPv4 packets. Different mechanisms have been developed to manage tunnels: automatic tunnels3, configured tunnels3, tunnel brokers3, 6over43, 6to43,…
Reference 2:
http://www.petri.co.il/ipv6-transition.htm
Network Address Translation – Protocol Translation (NAT-PT)
The NAT-PT method enables the ability to either statically or dynamically configure a translation of a IPv4 network address into an IPv6 network address and vice versa. For those familiar with more typically NAT implementations, the operation is very similar but includes a protocol translation function. NAT-PT also ties in an Application Layer Gateway (ALG) functionality that converts Domain Name System (DNS) mappings between protocols.
Dual Stack
The simplest approach when transitioning to IPv6 is to run IPv6 on all of the devices that are currently running IPv4. If this is something that is possible within the organizational network, it is very easy to implement.
However, for many organizations, IPv6 is not supported on all of the IPv4 devices; in these situations other methods must be considered.
Reference: http://www.opus1.com/ipv6/howdoitransitiontoipv6.html

Question: 23

Which OSI layer header contains the address of a destination host that is on another network?

A. application
B. session
C. transport
D. network
E. data link
F. physical

Answer: D

Explanation:
Only network address contains this information. To transmit the packets the sender uses network address and datalink address. But the layer 2 address represents just the address of the next hop device on the way to the sender. It is changed on each hop. Network address remains the same.

Question: 24

Which layer of the TCP/IP stack combines the OSI model physical and data link layers?

A. Internet layer
B. transport layer
C. application layer
D. network access layer

Answer: D

Explanation:
The Internet Protocol Suite, TCP/IP, is a suite of protocols used for communication over the internet. The TCP/ IP model was created after the OSI 7 layer model for two major reasons. First, the foundation of the Internet was built using the TCP/IP suite and through the spread of the World Wide Web and Internet, TCP/IP has been preferred. Second, a project researched by the Department of Defense (DOD) consisted of creating the TCP/IP protocols. The DOD’s goal was to bring international standards which could not be met by the OSI model.
Since the DOD was the largest software consumer and they preferred the TCP/IP suite, most vendors used this model rather than the OSI. Below is a side by side comparison of the TCP/IP and OSI models.

Question: 25

Which protocol uses a connection-oriented service to deliver files between end systems?

A. TFTP
B. DNS
C. FTP
D. SNMP
E. RIP

Answer: C

Explanation:
TCP is an example of a connection-oriented protocol. It requires a logical connection to be established between the two processes before data is exchanged. The connection must be maintained during the entire time that communication is taking place, then released afterwards. The process is much like a telephone call, where a virtual circuit is established–the caller must know the person’s telephone number and the phone must be answered–before the message can be delivered.
TCP/IP is also a connection-oriented transport with orderly release. With orderly release, any data remaining in the buffer is sent before the connection is terminated. The release is accomplished in a three-way handshake between client and server processes. The connection-oriented protocols in the OSI protocol suite, on the other hand, do not support orderly release. Applications perform any handshake necessary for ensuring orderly release.
Examples of services that use connection-oriented transport services are telnet, rlogin, and ftp.

Question: 26

Refer to the exhibit.

If the hubs in the graphic were replaced by switches, what would be virtually eliminated?

A. broadcast domains
B. repeater domains
C. Ethernet collisions
D. signal amplification
E. Ethernet broadcasts

Answer: C

Explanation:
Modern wired networks use a network switch to eliminate collisions. By connecting each device directly to a port on the switch, either each port on a switch becomes its own collision domain (in the case of half duplex links) or the possibility of collisions is eliminated entirely in the case of full duplex links.

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